Saturday, April 22, 2006

Batgirl Being Bad Is Bad

I have really been enjoying Adam Beechen's run on Robin so far, with one notable exception - it deals with a plot point that I think is pretty lame, which is that Cassandra Cain, daughter of the assasins David Cain (the guy who framed Bruce Wayne for murder) and Lady Shiva, is now a villain herself. However lame I think this particular plot point is, though, I know that it is an editorially mandated event, not anything that Adam Beechen came up with (same with the move I actually DID like, which was to remove Greg Rucka's new daughter of Ra's Al Ghul from comics), so, when I judge whether Beechen is doing a good job on Robin, I am not going to give him demerits for the lame plot point.


Blogger CalvinPitt said...

Are you referring to the person that's running around Gotham and killed a woman in this week's issue?

Because I actually think that isn't Cassandra. I've got a whole convoluted theory about how she reformed the League of Assassins to be a force for the elimination of evil.

Just have to wait to see how this storyline plays out I guess.

4/22/2006 08:58:00 PM  
Blogger Dean Trippe said...

i agree. it's another example of editorial not knowing what to do with female characters.

aside from that, i'm having a hard time reading robin after that stellar issue drawn by karl kerschl. that was too good for words. :(

4/22/2006 09:23:00 PM  
Blogger Steve Pheley said...

While it sure wouldn't surprise me to see a non-"classic" character (and particularly a female one) get made into a villain as a cheap stunt, I agree with calvinpitt -- my gut feeling is that there's more to this than might be apparent at first. So I'm reserving judgment for now.

4/22/2006 10:29:00 PM  
Anonymous SpiritGlyph said...

We're being shown someone who looks like Cassandra, but there's no actual confirmation here. This doesn't just smell like misdirection -- it reeks of it.

Personally, the only plot point that annoyed me was how Robin escaped the police station. He's trapped, surrounded by cops, and they're bringing in the SWAT teams. So what does he do? He steals a uniform, and it somehow works. Is the GCPD in the habit of employing 14-year-old cops? This kid with the same build, same hair, and the same age as Robin shows up in a location where Robin was known to be, and NONE of the cops think back to the thousands of action movies they've seen that trick in and wonder if Robin could possibly have put on a police uniform? He doesn't even look old enough to shave, you morons!

Okay, rant over.

4/23/2006 12:26:00 AM  
Anonymous Zard said...


It would be great to see Cassandra again operating as a hero. With the Batgirl series end, I would be happy to never see her again--being left quite satisfied with the character and story. The only disappointing thing they could do would be to bring her back as a villain.

All they have to do is not use the character and all would be well.

4/23/2006 02:18:00 AM  
Blogger Brian Cronin said...

I don't buy misdirection because nowhere in the comic does it have any character even HINT that Cassie might be a bad guy now. In fact, all the hints from characters have been the exact opposite.

Not even Shiva, who saw her at the end of the Batgirl series, and would have a pretty good idea that her little girl is pretty dark place right now.

And then the bit at the end about Cain? That struck me as total misdirection the OTHER way.

I hope Cassie is NOT a villain, but I'm pretty darn sure she is.

And I don't blame Beechen for that.

And yes, Freddie Williams III is no Karl Kerschl, but he did a pretty good job, I thought.

And yes, the plot point about no one noticing that it was a teen dressed in a cop uniform was odd.

4/23/2006 03:36:00 AM  
Anonymous Zard said...

Side note: does anyone have any idea what age post-Crisis Tim Drake is? In some comics he looks about 17 or 18 [Teen Titans], which is what he would be if IC didn't mess with continuity. But then in Robin and Detective he looks like he's somewhere around 12 to 14. When he was doing his homework on his bed, he struck me as a 14 year old kid.

A lot of "mysteries" presented OYL seem to not be genuine mystery stories, but rather things that everyone knows but the reader and they're just mysteries because they're off panel for the sake of making them mysteries. And that's the lamest kind of mystery.

So if he's 12 or 14, is Stephanie Brown, her baby and all, still in continuity? It's a mystery... kinda. Why and how is Gordon back? It's a mystery. Why doesn't Superman have powers? It's a mystery. 'Too many cryptic allusions!

Remember that time, when that one big thing happened? You know... it happened sometime in the past year? Wasn't that, you know, thing, jaw-droppingly amazing?

4/23/2006 04:02:00 AM  
Blogger Brian Cronin said...

It's funny, zard, because the very first One Year Later that I read, Detective Comics, was the WORST in that regard.

Each character literally said stuff like "Remember three months ago?"

"THREE months ago? What about EIGHT months ago!"

The whole issue.

4/23/2006 01:09:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"i agree. it's another example of editorial not knowing what to do with female characters."

Anonymous concurs. In a perfect world, this would be a part of some kind of a clever effort to rekindle interest in her and make her more, not less visible, but instead this really looks like some random crap they're shoehorning in because the editorial has no faith in this character. Is it really such a radical idea that perhaps just doing the same thing better is all that would be required? Hire good artists for a change, maybe have her join a team, treat her like she belongs?

Actually, you know what this looks like to me? The beginnings of an all-out move to sweep her under the proverbial rug (in spite of sales that were never really that bad). Did you notice how she played no part in Infinite Crisis? With a name as well known as 'Batgirl', you'd really expect her to be somewhere there.

4/24/2006 10:45:00 AM  

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