Wednesday, December 22, 2004

Turn Away From The Computer After Reading This...

...because I don't want you getting man-juice on your keyboard.

http://www.newsarama.com/DC/AS/AllStarSuperman_Morrison.htm

Tell us your reactions!

23 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

So, what percentage of posts here are going to invoke semen one way or another? And am I the only one who thinks that's a weird rhetorical device on which to base a comics commentary collective?

Rose

12/22/2004 06:33:00 AM  
Blogger Jake said...

I'm not sure what it all means, but I think it's oddly appropriate because reading this news gave me a boner.

That is all.

12/22/2004 06:35:00 AM  
Blogger Joe Rice said...

I'm torn. On the one hand: Morrison/Quitely just makes people ejaculate. On the other . . .even Brian's using sperm metaphors? What's wrong with us?

12/22/2004 06:48:00 AM  
Blogger Joe Rice said...

That interview makes my heart soar to the clouds.

12/22/2004 06:56:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is probably the closest I'll come to be excited about a Superman comic; however, part of me can't help but be a little sad. Morrison/Quitely on Superman will undoubtedly be on the top of the sales charts, while Morrison/Quitely on WE3 barely cracks the top 100.

--GA--

12/22/2004 10:04:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hearing "Morrison writes Superman" got me all excited, but having Frank "Lemon Lips" Quitely on the art is a bit of a buzzkill. It'll be almost worth it, though, if we get a We3-style treatment of Krypto the superdog.
--
J. Kevin Carrier

12/22/2004 10:19:00 AM  
Blogger Ed Cunard said...

What if all the semen references indicate how much these six nerds believe in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us?

...

I'm stretching, aren't I?

I am, though, really looking forward to it, as well as the conclusion to WE3.

12/22/2004 12:13:00 PM  
Blogger Paul said...

It's my solemn vow to never again mention semen within the confines of this column. I will also not mention spunk, sperm, pearl necklaces, jism, cum, load-blowing, man chowder, weiner snot, baby batter, jabluby, DNA dew, or onanism output. Yes, I made many of those up, but I promise you that I will never mention them again.

Except maybe "jabluby," because that one's just cute.

And how else would I express what this paragraph...

"The Fortress appears in issue #2, stuffed with a ton of new toys and gets haunted by the bandaged ghost of the Unknown Superman of 4500 AD. The Kandorians finally get out of that bottle. Superman gets a new power. Clark Kent winds up sharing a prison cell with Lex Luthor in issue #5. The Bizarro Cube Earth invades our world in an epic 2-part adventure (no 'decompression' here!) and we're recasting the Bizarros as a frightening, unstoppable zombie-plague style menace. Bizarro Jor-El and the Bizarro JLA turn up in the second part of that story too. What else? We meet Earth's replacement Superman and Clark Kent takes on a new superhero identity...Ten of the 12 issues are complete short stories in 22 pages, so lots of stuff happens. And it all links together as a maxi-arc or whatever they call them these days, entitled 'The 12 Labors of Superman'."...

...makes me so, so liable to do?

12/22/2004 01:21:00 PM  
Blogger Paul said...

Here's another interesting bit, maybe deserving of its own BLOG:

"One gets DC to the masses by putting these books in manga format and making them available in every cinema, record store and bookshop. That's not my job, however. All I can do is make the stories as good as I can. All Frank can do is draw as well as he can. If we still can't sell well-written, well-drawn books at a time when everybody in the world is watching superhero movies and eating superhero cereals, it's because the pricing, format, promotion and availability of comic books is preventing us from cracking the glass ceiling. Comics used to be available everywhere."

He's clearly on the nose, but everybody pays lip service to these ideas. He's right when he says it's not his job, but what about the people whose job it IS? How can they course correct? It seems like the american comics industry just doesn't have the first clue about business.

How do you get reformatted, re-priced comics into new places? How do you guarantee they sell at bookstores, pharmacies, theaters (?), etc.?

12/22/2004 02:34:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I don't recall any mention on how this "All Star" Superman story is going to be packaged. All I recall hearing is "prestige format", which usually spells out $$$$$.

Wouldn't it be interesting if DC actually packaged them in a nice manga format like Morrison suggests?

12/22/2004 02:44:00 PM  
Blogger Michael said...

This is most definitely good news. Good Superman comics are good for the whole industry.

12/22/2004 04:58:00 PM  
Blogger James said...

It's a shame to see that he's fallen for the "make it like manga" mantra as well. Even when he's said stuff that's annoyed the hell out of me in the past, at least Morrison's been original.

12/22/2004 08:07:00 PM  
Blogger Joe Rice said...

Agreeing with something doesn't necessarily make you a follower. Thinking that breathing air is pretty cool is a very popular notion to which I bet Morrison also ascribes.

The notion that comics need to change in order to succeed, perhaps in manga-like ways (lots of content, cheaper, etc) isn't about originality or not. It's about what's right for the industry.

12/22/2004 09:25:00 PM  
Blogger James said...

Yeah, but we all know the benefits of breathing, don't we? And we also know the benefits of American books chasing a "manga format." (One of these is zero, the other is not.)

It got lots of mockery when Marvel said it, anyway...

12/22/2004 10:29:00 PM  
Blogger Ed Cunard said...

I thought Marvel got knocked for it because they thought that simply redoing the '60s comics with updated pop culture references and quasi-manga looking artists was the way to go...

The format itself rocks. I hear there's been some success with the MY FAITH IN FRANKIE digest, as well as a few others. There's nothing inherently wrong with the digest format.

12/22/2004 10:41:00 PM  
Blogger James said...

Oh no, Ed, didn't mean to suggest there was. I like the format. I see essentially nothing wrong with using it.

I disagree, however, that this is what will suddenly make SUPERMAN interesting to all those people who aren't reading it now. It hasn't worked for anything else, there's nothing even remotely suggesting it will.

Look, remember a year or so ago, when people were making the argument that they don't read other genres in comics because they get their fixes elsewhere? Has it not ocurred (I may have spelled that wrong) to anyone that the same theory works in reverse? That people who pile into superhero films won't necessarily have an interest in the comics? (Because they haven't, you know.) And that if you make the comics smaller and cheaper and design their covers better and draw them really really well, they will still be comics and those people will *still* not want to read them?

Morrison has tunnel vision. He's passionate about superhero comics, and can't seem to understand that millions upon millions of other people are not.

12/22/2004 11:33:00 PM  
Blogger Joe Rice said...

Honestly, though, I don't think Grant is really talking about a mass audience of adults and such. I think he's talking about kids and teenagers . . .the ones superhero comics were originally aimed at, the ones with the most inherent appeal when it comes to superheroes. Kids love comics, but they're not buying them.

12/23/2004 07:00:00 AM  
Blogger Joe Rice said...

Yum:

http://img157.exs.cx/img157/2253/allstarssuperman3im.jpg

12/23/2004 07:01:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"I can assure fans that there will be no fill-in artists on this book. It's me and Frank for 12 full issues."

This is all I needed to hear.

12/23/2004 07:32:00 AM  
Blogger Paul said...

"Look, remember a year or so ago, when people were making the argument that they don't read other genres in comics because they get their fixes elsewhere? Has it not ocurred (I may have spelled that wrong) to anyone that the same theory works in reverse? That people who pile into superhero films won't necessarily have an interest in the comics? (Because they haven't, you know.) And that if you make the comics smaller and cheaper and design their covers better and draw them really really well, they will still be comics and those people will *still* not want to read them?

Morrison has tunnel vision. He's passionate about superhero comics, and can't seem to understand that millions upon millions of other people are not."

But if they're digging on super-heroes in other media, what's stopping them from digging on them in the comics? Is it strictly that different people prefer different media? All those millions upon millions just don't like comics? Why is that? Is it unchangeable?

You're right, there's not much evidence to suggest that the culture would all of a sudden accept comic books if they were formatted and priced differently.

But what we do know is that the product we have now isn't working. The audience is shrinking, the creators incestuous. Right? At least, this is what we keep hearing. Am I working from faulty assumptions on that?

And if not, can nothing be done? Are comics a thing of the past?

12/23/2004 11:46:00 AM  
Blogger Max Zero said...

Nah, comics aren't a thing of the past. The industry might choke and die, (and, as far as I'm concerned, it deserves to,) but the medium will go on for ever.

If Marvel and DC both rolled over and died tomorrow, a lot of people would lose their livelihoods and that would be a shame, but there will always be comic books. It's one of the few mediums where you don't need a huge amount of capital and a large staff to get your stories out there and there will always be people who think the comic form serves their stories best.

Word and pictures, man. You can do anything with words and pictures. It's the easiest way to educate people and like Joe said, kids love 'em, they're just not offering what kids want at the price they want to pay.

If this new version of Superman doesn't reach a mass audience, so what? A lot of people, including me, are still going to get a great deal of enjoyment out of it. Who cares if millions of people don't read it? That's their problem.

12/23/2004 01:42:00 PM  
Blogger James said...

That's pretty much my opinion. It's very easy for someone to say, "they should do X, it's simple, but I'm not a businessman so don't ask me how."

Advertising-- where's that money come from? Bookstore market-- would a returnable market stand for the inconsistency of books with artists like Quitely or Hitch?

So maybe we're talking OGNs, rather than TPBs? So where's the money come from to pay them for 6 to 12 months of steady work upfront?

Honestly? I think the DM has to fail. And I don't want it to. I don't want to see storeowners and their staff out of work. I don't want Marvel and DC to downsize or close-- at the very least because I don't want the freelance illustration market to be flooded with even more competition.

But the circles are too vicious, and the roots are too entertwined. The only way out for mainstream superheroes is to watch the shit burn to the ground, and build on the empty plot. I don't *advocate* it, but I predict it.

All of this, of course, is without acknowledging that "comics" don't equal "Marvel and DC" and that the form, really, is doing better than it has in 20 years. The fact that everyone keeps saying, "Manga's doig great; why can't comics do that?" is proof to me that the DM's not going to find a way out of the hole.

The thing is, it's perfectly logical that someone who'd like superhero movies would like the comics too. That's why I'm here. But logic has nothing to do with taste, you know? You can't account for it. People just don't want the comics-- and I'll bet there's people even Larry Young couldn't convince.

12/23/2004 02:30:00 PM  
Blogger Paul said...

James said: "The thing is, it's perfectly logical that someone who'd like superhero movies would like the comics too. That's why I'm here. But logic has nothing to do with taste, you know? You can't account for it. People just don't want the comics-- and I'll bet there's people even Larry Young couldn't convince."

What? Really? There's no accounting for it? There has to be some explanation, hasn't there?

Why don't more people read comics?

It's because the big guys in America, the only really visible-to-the-mainstream makers of comic books are really horribly nerdy.

12/28/2004 02:55:00 PM  

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